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History

The Team 

Staff Member 

Role 

Email Address 

Mr. C. Gregory 

Curriculum leader for History 

gregoryc@ursuline.kent.sch.uk 

Mr. J. Joyce 

Director of Sixth Form

joycej@ursuline.kent.sch.uk 

Mrs. R. Williams 

Teacher of History 

williamsr@ursuline.kent.sch.uk 

Ms. G. West 

Teacher of History 

westg@ursuline.kent.sch.uk 

 

Key Stage 3 

At Key Stage 3 all students study History for four lessons a fortnight.  Our curriculum begins with a study of Medieval Britain and ends by analysing significant events of the 20th century.  History is taught both chronologically and thematically in order to develop the key skills required for the study of GCSE History and beyond.  Furthermore, there is a substantial study of British history across time as well as an in depth study of some other countries and cultures in order to make the Key Stage 3 curriculum broad and balanced.  Assessment at Key Stage 3 provides a foundation for the skills of using historical sources and demonstrating knowledge that are required in Key Stage 4 and 5. 

 

 

Cycle 1 

Cycle 2 

Cycle 3 

Cycle 4 

Year 7 

What is history? 

 

The Causes of the Battle of Hastings 

 

The impact of the Norman conquest on England 

 

How castles developed in the Middle Ages 

 

The significance of religion in the Middle Ages 

 

Plague and protest in Medieval England 

The causes and consequences of the Wars of the Roses 

 

The significance of the reign of the Tudors – Henry VII, Henry VIII, Mary I and Elizabeth I. 

 

The development of life in Tudor England – schools, food, crime and punishment. 

 

The causes and consequences of the Gunpowder Plot 1605  

 

The causes and consequences of the English Civil War and the significance of the actions of Cromwell 

 

The causes and consequences of the Plague 1665, the great fire of London 1666 and the Glorious Revolution 1688. 

 

Year 8 

The reasons for the development of the British Empire 

 

The causes and consequences of the French Revolution and the significance of the battles of Trafalgar and Waterloo. 

 

The impact and abolition of the slave trade 

 

The impact of the industrial revolution on society and the economy in Britain 

 

The impact of developments in transport on society and the economy in Britain and in the local area 

The significance of developments in crime and punishment during the industrial revolution 

 

The significance of developments in health and medicine during the industrial revolution. 

 

The role and status of women in British society and how this changed over time 

The causes of the First World War 

 

The events and consequences of the First World War 

Year 9 

Democracy and dictatorship in 20th century Europe 

 

The causes of Hitler’s rise to power 

 

Changes to life in Nazi Germany 

 

 

The causes of WW2  

 

The events of the Second World War  

 

Life in post-war Britain 

 

Post- World War II conflicts – the Cold War 

 

The significance of events and individuals in the development of African American civil rights in the USA from 1945-68 

 

The impact of terrorism in the late 20th and early 21st centuries 

 

 

Key Stage 4 

Exam Board: Eduqas 

Link to Specification: https://www.eduqas.co.uk/qualifications/history-gcse/ 

 

Future Careers:  The skills developed in History are applicable to a wide range of careers, including- 

Law 

Politics 

Public sector 

Business 

Marketing 

Journalism 

Economics 

Teaching 

Academia 

Insurance 

Social research 

Archaeology and curation (museums, galleries, archives and libraries) 

 

From Year 10 students will have the option to take History as a GCSE. We follow the WJEC Eduqas specification. At Key Stage 4 the curriculum builds upon the topics and skills developed in Key Stage 3 as well as looking more broadly at world history through the study of the USA from 1929-2000.  There are regular trips to Berlin to study the history of Nazi Germany to provide context to one of the areas of study.  

The GCSE History course is made up of two Components: 

 

Component 1: Studies in Depth 

This component is in two parts and students will study one element of British History and one non-British History from different historical eras. For the British element students will study The Elizabethan Age from 1558-1603. For the non-British element students will study Germany in Transition from 1919-1939, where they will focus on the rise of the Nazi Party and life in Hitler’s Germany. 

Component 2: Studies in Breadth 

This component is split into two parts and students will carry out a Period Study and a Thematic Study. The Period Study will be The Development of the USA from 1929 to 2000 and the Thematic Study will be focused on Changes in Crime and Punishment in Britain from around the year 500 to the present day. 

Examinations 

Component 1: Studies in Depth 

Two written examinations of 2 hours (split into two papers of 1 hour duration each). This accounts for 50% of the qualification. 

Component 2: Studies in Breadth 

Two Written examinations of 2 hours (split into two papers of 45 minutes for the Period Study and 1 hour 15 minutes for the Thematic Study). This accounts for 50% of qualification. 

 

 

Cycle 1 

Cycle 2 

Cycle 3 

Cycle 4 

Year 10 

The key elements of Elizabethan government 

 

Lifestyles of the rich and poor 

 

Popular entertainment in Elizabethan England including the development of the theatre 

 

The key elements of the religious settlement 

 

The Catholic Threat 

 

The causes and consequences of the Spanish Armada 

 

The Puritan Threat 

 

The situation in Germany at the end of WW1 

 

The political and economic problems of the Weimar Republic 

 

Germany under Stresemann 1923-9, the ‘golden age’ 

 

The Great Depression and the collapse of Weimar 

 

The early Nazi Party and the Munich Putsch 

 

The reasons for Hitler’s growing popularity and rise to power in 1933 

 

Hitler’s consolidation of power 1933-34 

 

The police state and propaganda 

 

Life for workers in Nazi Germany 1933-9 

 

Life for women and children in Nazi Germany 1933-9 

 

Hitler’s foreign policy 1933-9 

 

Year 11 

The causes of crime in Britain c.500 to Present Day 

 

The nature of crime in Britain c.500 to Present Day 

 

Responsibility for enforcing the law in Britain c.500 to Present Day 

 

The methods of enforcing the law in Britain c.500 to Present Day 

 

The methods of punishment in Britain c.500 to Present Day 

 

Attitudes to punishment in Britain c.500 to Present Day 

 

The impact of the Wall Street Crash and the Great Depression 

 

The policies of Hoover and the 1932 election 

 

The successes and failures of Roosevelt’s New Deal 

 

The economic impact of the Second World War 

 

Affluence and Suburbia in the 1950s and 1960s 

 

The issue of civil rights in the USA 1941-70 

 

The policies of President’s Kennedy and Johnson 

 

 

Key Stage 5 

Exam Board: OCR 

Link to Specification: https://www.ocr.org.uk/qualifications/as-and-a-level/history-a-h105-h505-from-2015/ 

 

Future Careers: The skills developed in History are applicable to a wide range of careers, including-  

Law 

Politics 

Public sector 

Business 

Marketing 

Journalism 

Economics 

Teaching 

Academia 

Insurance 

Social research 

Archaeology and curation (museums, galleries, archives and libraries 

 

The department aims to develop history students who possess valuable background knowledge of current affairs as well as in depth knowledge of the topics studied.  Just as importantly, they will have developed the skills which are so highly prized in employment and further education in research, analysis of sources and data, and then the construction of well-evidenced arguments. 

 

Some students each year will proceed to go and take History degrees at University and will have been prepared, through the curriculum we have chosen, to be successful in further education.  Equally students will be able to use history as a stepping stone to many other degree courses and employment opportunities, especially in related fields such as Law, Journalism, Politics, Economics and Business Studies, International Relations, History of Art, Languages, Social Studies, Police and Armed Forces.  Some students have also successfully combined it with Mathematics or Science subjects to go on to careers in Medicine, Veterinary Science or Engineering.  Therefore, the study of History at A Level should been seen as a passport to success in any future area of work or study. 

This is a two-year programme of study and students follow the OCR History A Level specification. The two units that students study in Year 12 are Italian History from 1896 to 1945, with a particular focus on the role of Mussolini, and a breadth study of the Wars of the Roses 1445-1509: Lancastrians, Yorkists and Henry VII. In Year 13 student will complete an independent study based on a topic of their choosing, followed by a thematic breadth study of Civil Rights in America in the 20th century.  It is hoped that the breadth studies taught in Key Stage 3 and 4 have given students chronological understanding and the ability to identify and evaluate change and continuity over time. These are the essential skills required to be successful in this vital unit. 

 

Examinations 

15% Italy 1896–1943- This is a written examination that contains two traditional essay questions. 

25% Britain, Wars of the Roses – This is a written examination with the main focus of using historical sources. 

20% Independent Essay – One coursework question based on a topic chosen by students 

40% Civil Rights in the USA – This is a written examination that contains two traditional essay questions 

 

 

Cycle 1 

Cycle 2 

Cycle 3 

Cycle 4 

Year 12 

The Causes of the Wars of the Roses 

 

The factors that brought Mussolini to power 

 

Edward IV’s first reign 

 

Mussolini’s consolidation of power 

Edward IV second reign and the usurpation of Richard III 

 

Mussolini’s social and economic policies 

 

 

Henry VII’s reign 

 

Mussolini’s foreign policies 

Year 13 

Independent essay 

African-American rights 

 

Native-American rights 

 

Women’s rights 

 

 

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We value the whole person, spiritual, physical and intellectual

We value forgiveness and reconciliation

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Trust Information

Ursuline College is an academy, and part of the Kent Catholic Schools’ Partnership. The Kent Catholic Schools’ Partnership is an exempt charity and a company limited by guarantee registered in England and Wales under company registration number 08176019 at registered address: Barham Court, Teston, Maidstone, Kent, ME18 5BZ. St Edmund's Catholic School is a business name of Kent Catholic Schools’ Partnership.

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